Sexual

What is safe sex?

Safe is any form of sexual encounter whereby no HIV-positive blood, semen or vaginal fluid enters the body. Read more (in Dutch only). What must you consider to practice safe sex? Use a condom when you have vaginal and anal sexual contact (fucking and buttfucking). Take care during oral sex that no sperm enters your mouth or that you don't come in someone else's mouth. If you want to be certain about this, then use a condom. The chance of anyone becoming infected with HIV by licking the clitoris and vagina (eating pussy) is slight. Eating pussy during menstruation is unsafe. For safe oral sex, you can use small sheets of latex called dental dams.

What is unsafe sex?

Vaginal and anal sexual contact without the use of a condom are unsafe. Vaginal sexual contact (fucking) without a condom can result in the man infecting the woman and vice versa. Anal sexual contact (buttfucking) without a condom, between men or between a man and a woman, can easily end up with the HIV virus entering the partner's bloodstream.

When must you address the issues of risk?

When there is blood-to-blood contact or blood-to-sperm contact, and one of two persons has the HIV virus in their blood. What is PEP? PEP stands for Post Exposure Prophylaxis (P.E.P). It is a treatment using HIV medication given as soon as possible (preferably between 2 and 72 hours) after a possible contact with HIV. There must be some risk of infection, for example, a condom breaking or after unsafe sex when it is certain that the other person has HIV. PEP is available through the GGD and after hours at your local hospital. It is advisable first to ring before you show up. Prescribing PEP is dependent on whether you have been exposed to risk. Doctors' opinions may vary. The effectiveness of PEP is not unquestionably proven, but it is probable that PEP reduces the chances of someone becoming HIV positive. Taking a PEP regimen can, like taking HIV medication, have side effects.

What is PEP?

PEP stands for Post Exposure Prophylaxis (P.E.P). It is a treatment using HIV medication given as soon as possible (preferably within 2 hours and at the latest within 72 hours) after a possible contact with HIV. There must be some risk of infection, for example, a condom breaking or after unsafe sex when it is certain that the other person has HIV.
PEP is available through the GGD and after hours at your local hospital. It is advisable first to ring before you show up. Prescribing PEP is dependent on whether you have been exposed to risk. Doctors' opinions may vary. The effectiveness of PEP is not unquestionably proven, but it is probable that PEP reduces the chances of someone becoming HIV positive. Taking a PEP regimen can, like taking HIV medication, have side effects.

Is there a chance of lower risk with a lower viral load?

If the viral load is undetectable (not measurable in the blood), this means that there is little HIV in the blood. It is highly likely that there may thus be much smaller chance of transmission. When there is little HIV in the blood, then there's also low amounts in the sperm or vaginal fluids. The amount of the fall of the viral load in the blood, sperm, or vaginal fluid can nevertheless be smaller or bigger. Thus unprotected sex with an undetectable viral load is much safer than with a higher viral load, but a very small risk might remain.

end faq

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