Physical and psychological factors

If there is something going on in terms of your experience of sex or your sexual behaviour, you are the only oneseks problemen who can say whether or not it is a problem. If it does not bother you in any way, it is not a problem. With many sexual problems, physical and psychological factors play a role. For example: physical pain can reduce your appetite for sex. And of course your relationship can also have something to do with it. It is often difficult to distinguish causes from consequences, especially if problems have already existed for some time. And one sexual problem may lead to another sexual problem. Having a dry vagina or having problems getting or maintaining an erection can result in less desire for sex, for example.

A pretty good sex life
After a while, most people with HIV will have a pretty good sex life. There are some people who never experience any changes in their sexuality resulting from their HIV. But many others are a bit more inhibited in that regard. People commonly find it difficult to have dates or enter into relationships. They dread having to tell the other person about their HIV or they are afraid of passing the virus on to others. In some cases, they might end up abstaining from sex altogether, though they still have a need for sexuality and intimacy. That is often a real struggle. All the worrying that goes along with that can also lead to sexual problems: erection problems, a dry vagina, being less able to let yourself go during sex, or feeling pain during sex.
Loek Elsenburg, HIV nurse

Contact

Hiv Vereniging Nederland

Eerste Helmersstraat 17

1054 CX AMSTERDAM

020 6 160 160

servicepunt@hivnet.org
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Servicepunt

020 689 25 77
servicepunt@hivnet.org


For questions about living with HIV. Available monday, tuesday and thursday from 2 PM till 10 PM

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